Mappa Mundi Project

A project where we had to create a metaphorical map that described something other than a place.

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mappa mundi.jpgFor this project I decided to develop one of my previous ideas. I chose to use my idea of an ant hill replacing a brain with the ants carrying information all over the body as the basis for this project. I thought that this idea would work well as a metaphorical map as it could be seen as informative but at the same time the idea is quite playful. I started this project by drawing the head and shoulders with the ant hill and using watercolour and collage. I also tried drawing a basic human form with the ants running across it to try and communicate the idea of them carrying information to different parts of the body. However, my simplistic human form didn’t work quite well as I imagined the images to look more like traditional scientific diagrams of the body with the ants running about inside. I then decided to use diagrams from the 19th century as a base from my work which I then added the ants and in some cases colour to. This idea was party influenced by Kanitta Meechubet who uses similar imagery in her work. I thought this use of collage would also be helpful as this project was short and I wouldn’t have time to recreate similar images in such detail myself. I collected diagrams of different body parts  and added the ants using pen and watercolour. I also added colour to some of the black and white images using gouache. I found one diagram that worked well for the head and another that worked well for the torso. I then combined them to form one image using Photoshop. I think that the final outcome is effective to communicate my idea as it looks like a scientific diagram but at the same time it is metaphorical because of the ants. If I had had more time I would have liked to have tried drawing the complex diagram of the different parts of the body myself. I think that the ants could also be made more clear so that they are more obvious but I quite like how they slowly reveal themselves and in turn the viewer slowly comes to understand the idea of the image.

Editorial Project – Fright Night

My final illustration and GIF for Fright Night an article by Graham Lawton from a New Science magazine.

haunted-dolls-house.gif

This illustration is for an article titled Fright Night by Graham Lawton from a New Science magazine. The article talked about how people like frightening themselves and why this is the case. I tried to illustrate this by creating a quirky haunted dolls house. I thought that this worked well with the article as it portrays the fun involved with being scared by a book or film and it works well to draw the reader in. I decided to explore materials again in this project by using a mixture of watercolour, collage and gouache paint to create this image. I think the collage really helps to give the image life and a sense of fun which is what I wanted to include in my work.

Editorial Illustration – Project 1

My final illustration for an Editorial Project where we had to select an article and produce an image for it.

final image.jpgThis Illustration is the final outcome for a project where we had to select an article from The New York Times Opinion Pages. The article I chose was titled Playing the Online Dating Game, in a Wheelchair, written by Emily Ladau. The article was about her experiences of online dating and it explained how she found people tended to focus on her disability and her wheelchair rather than focusing on her as a person. I illustrated this by using a wheelchair with a small doll on it to show that some people focus on her wheelchair and not on her. I chose to use a doll to represent the author as I think that it symbolises how some of the people treated her when they learnt about her disability, as some dismissed her and rejected her, not treating her with respect.

Editorial Illustration

A short analysis of a piece of editorial illustration and how it works within context.

Spite is Good. Spite Works.

By Natalie Angier

Illustrations by Serge Bloch

This article is about spite and how it affects human behaviour. It talks about how psychologists view spite as a negative trait but now it is being considered as something positive because of the role that it may have played in developing some positive traits such as cooperation and a sense of fair play. 

Serge’s work illustrates the theme of this article well through the use of colour and subjects. The sickly green colour is commonly associated with negative feelings such as jealousy and spite. The purple contrasts with the green colour which portrays the conflict between the two characters in the images and the conflict that sometimes ensues because of spiteful individuals.

I think that the first image clearly illustrates the idea that spitefulness is ‘the urge to punish, hurt, humiliate or harass another’. It portrays this in a simple almost diagram like effect which is easy to follow and understand.

I think that the second image shows that there is no winner when you are spiteful. It clearly demonstrates that if you go out of your way to hurt or offend others then it will do you harm as well. The simplistic art helps to make this clear as it communicates its message simply.

Serge Bloch has responded to this article with two simple images that communicate their message clearly without unneeded complexity.